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Difference between revisions of "Dimmock, West Virginia"

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[[Image:BigBend-RushRun-1901.jpg|thumb|1901 C&O track diagram showing Big Bend Coal Co.]]
 
[[Image:BigBend-RushRun-1901.jpg|thumb|1901 C&O track diagram showing Big Bend Coal Co.]]
 
[[Image:Thurmond-Dimmock-Beury-1903-1904.png|thumb|Map of 1903-04 showing Dimmock and vicinity]]
 
[[Image:Thurmond-Dimmock-Beury-1903-1904.png|thumb|Map of 1903-04 showing Dimmock and vicinity]]
Dimmock was a small settlement about one mile west (downstream) of [[Thurmond, West Virginia|Thurmond]], across the [[New River]] nearly opposite the mining town of [[Rush Run (historical)|Rush Run]]. Shirley Donnelly, local history columnist, reported that John G. Brunk opened the Dimmock mine in 1890. However we have found no records of the mine's operation prior to 1892.  
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Dimmock was a small settlement about one mile west (downstream) of [[Thurmond, West Virginia|Thurmond]], across the [[New River]] nearly opposite the mining town of [[Rush Run (historical)|Rush Run]]. A post office was established at Dimmock at an unknown date. [1] Shirley Donnelly, local history columnist, reported that John G. Brunk opened the Dimmock mine in 1890. However we have found no records of the mine's operation prior to 1892.  
  
It is interesting to note that Dimmock is shown on maps as early as 1874, nearly 20 years before any mining activity began in the vicinity of the Dimmock. This early recognition of Dimmock was apparently due to the fact that a station was established at Dimmock by the C&O Railroad as early as 1873, the year that C&O was completed from Richmond, VA to [[Huntington, West Virginia|Huntington, WV]]. At that time, Dimmock was the only station on the C&O mainline between [[McKendree, West Virginia|McKendree]] and [[Sewell, West Virginia|Sewell]]. Between Oct. 1, 1873 and Sept. 30, 1874 Dimmock Station only sent and received a very small amount of freight shipments, sending out 8.62 tons and receiving 2.57 tons. It did however have 280 passengers that left through Dimmock Station and 324 arriving passengers between Oct. 1, 1873 and Sept. 30, 1874, which were remarkable numbers considering that Dimmock was quite literately "in the middle of nowhere" at this early date.[1]
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It is interesting to note that Dimmock is shown on maps as early as 1874, nearly 20 years before any mining activity began in the vicinity of the Dimmock. This early recognition of Dimmock was apparently due to the fact that a station was established at Dimmock by the C&O Railroad as early as 1873, the year that C&O was completed from Richmond, VA to [[Huntington, West Virginia|Huntington, WV]]. At that time, Dimmock was the only station on the C&O mainline between [[McKendree, West Virginia|McKendree]] and [[Sewell, West Virginia|Sewell]]. Between Oct. 1, 1873 and Sept. 30, 1874 Dimmock Station only sent and received a very small amount of freight shipments, sending out 8.62 tons and receiving 2.57 tons. It did however have 280 passengers that left through Dimmock Station and 324 arriving passengers between Oct. 1, 1873 and Sept. 30, 1874, which were remarkable numbers considering that Dimmock was quite literately "in the middle of nowhere" at this early date.[2]
  
The name of the mine was apparently changed from Dimmock to Big Bend in about 1901. State mining records indicate the Dimmock mine was operated by the Dimmock Coal & Coke Company between 1892-1900 and by the Isabel Coal Company in 1905 -- the Big Bend mine operated by the Big Bend Coal Company between 1901-1920.[2]
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The name of the mine was apparently changed from Dimmock to Big Bend in about 1901. State mining records indicate the Dimmock mine was operated by the Dimmock Coal & Coke Company between 1892-1900 and by the Isabel Coal Company in 1905 -- the Big Bend mine operated by the Big Bend Coal Company between 1901-1920.[3]
  
 
A circa-1896 list of mines in the Third Mining District of West Virginia listed the Dimmock Coal & Coke Company as operating the Dimmock mine, describing it as a drift mine working the Fire Creek seam of 4 ft. 6 in. thickness. The company employed 105 workers and W. H. Thayer was superintendent. The company's post office address was Dimmock.
 
A circa-1896 list of mines in the Third Mining District of West Virginia listed the Dimmock Coal & Coke Company as operating the Dimmock mine, describing it as a drift mine working the Fire Creek seam of 4 ft. 6 in. thickness. The company employed 105 workers and W. H. Thayer was superintendent. The company's post office address was Dimmock.
  
A 1906 C&O Railway publication listed the Isabel Coal & Coke Company as operating a mine at a  station named Dimmock. In the same publication an advertisement showed the Dimmock mine as being operated by the Isabel Coal & Coke Company, with T. C. Beury, Pres., and Ernest Echols, Treasurer. The company then maintained a tipple, company store, homes for workers, and was marketed as a shipper of "a superior grade of river sand." The population of Dimmock was estimated at 49 persons in 1910 by the West Virginia Geological Survey.[3]
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A 1906 C&O Railway publication listed the Isabel Coal & Coke Company as operating a mine at a  station named Dimmock. In the same publication an advertisement showed the Dimmock mine as being operated by the Isabel Coal & Coke Company, with T. C. Beury, Pres., and Ernest Echols, Treasurer. The company then maintained a tipple, company store, homes for workers, and was marketed as a shipper of "a superior grade of river sand." The population of Dimmock was estimated at 49 persons in 1910 by the West Virginia Geological Survey.[4]
  
 
A 1921 list of coal mines in West Virginia listed the Big Bend Coal as operating the Big Bend mine, with a post office address at [[Thurmond, West Virginia|Thurmond]].  
 
A 1921 list of coal mines in West Virginia listed the Big Bend Coal as operating the Big Bend mine, with a post office address at [[Thurmond, West Virginia|Thurmond]].  
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<h3>Sources</h3>
 
<h3>Sources</h3>
  
[1] Annual Report of the President and Directors of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad (1874) via [https://books.google.com/books?id=oS8oAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA6-PA9 Google Books]<br />
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[1] United States Official Postal Guide (1919) via [https://books.google.com/books?id=sQQDAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA1 Google Books]<br />
[2] West Virginia Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training, mine data tonnage reports<br />
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[2] Annual Report of the President and Directors of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad (1874) via [https://books.google.com/books?id=oS8oAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA6-PA9 Google Books]<br />
[3] Chesapeake & Ohio Railway: Official Industrial Guide and Shippers' Directory (1906) via [https://books.google.com/books?id=qwYoAAAAYAAJ&dq=C%26O+Railway+industrial+shippers+guide Google Books]<br/>
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[3] West Virginia Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training, mine data tonnage reports<br />
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[4] Chesapeake & Ohio Railway: Official Industrial Guide and Shippers' Directory (1906) via [https://books.google.com/books?id=qwYoAAAAYAAJ&dq=C%26O+Railway+industrial+shippers+guide Google Books]<br/>

Revision as of 00:13, 30 July 2015

1901 C&O track diagram showing Big Bend Coal Co.
Map of 1903-04 showing Dimmock and vicinity

Dimmock was a small settlement about one mile west (downstream) of Thurmond, across the New River nearly opposite the mining town of Rush Run. A post office was established at Dimmock at an unknown date. [1] Shirley Donnelly, local history columnist, reported that John G. Brunk opened the Dimmock mine in 1890. However we have found no records of the mine's operation prior to 1892.

It is interesting to note that Dimmock is shown on maps as early as 1874, nearly 20 years before any mining activity began in the vicinity of the Dimmock. This early recognition of Dimmock was apparently due to the fact that a station was established at Dimmock by the C&O Railroad as early as 1873, the year that C&O was completed from Richmond, VA to Huntington, WV. At that time, Dimmock was the only station on the C&O mainline between McKendree and Sewell. Between Oct. 1, 1873 and Sept. 30, 1874 Dimmock Station only sent and received a very small amount of freight shipments, sending out 8.62 tons and receiving 2.57 tons. It did however have 280 passengers that left through Dimmock Station and 324 arriving passengers between Oct. 1, 1873 and Sept. 30, 1874, which were remarkable numbers considering that Dimmock was quite literately "in the middle of nowhere" at this early date.[2]

The name of the mine was apparently changed from Dimmock to Big Bend in about 1901. State mining records indicate the Dimmock mine was operated by the Dimmock Coal & Coke Company between 1892-1900 and by the Isabel Coal Company in 1905 -- the Big Bend mine operated by the Big Bend Coal Company between 1901-1920.[3]

A circa-1896 list of mines in the Third Mining District of West Virginia listed the Dimmock Coal & Coke Company as operating the Dimmock mine, describing it as a drift mine working the Fire Creek seam of 4 ft. 6 in. thickness. The company employed 105 workers and W. H. Thayer was superintendent. The company's post office address was Dimmock.

A 1906 C&O Railway publication listed the Isabel Coal & Coke Company as operating a mine at a station named Dimmock. In the same publication an advertisement showed the Dimmock mine as being operated by the Isabel Coal & Coke Company, with T. C. Beury, Pres., and Ernest Echols, Treasurer. The company then maintained a tipple, company store, homes for workers, and was marketed as a shipper of "a superior grade of river sand." The population of Dimmock was estimated at 49 persons in 1910 by the West Virginia Geological Survey.[4]

A 1921 list of coal mines in West Virginia listed the Big Bend Coal as operating the Big Bend mine, with a post office address at Thurmond.

Exploring Dimmock

Rafter's Reference: the ruins of Dimmock are located along the railroad on river-right (private property, no trespassing permitted), downstream of Thurmond. (Dimmock can be viewed from Rush Run, located on river-left, just downstream and opposite of the Dimmock site.)

1890s photo showing the tipple and some of the company houses at Dimmock


Sources

[1] United States Official Postal Guide (1919) via Google Books
[2] Annual Report of the President and Directors of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad (1874) via Google Books
[3] West Virginia Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training, mine data tonnage reports
[4] Chesapeake & Ohio Railway: Official Industrial Guide and Shippers' Directory (1906) via Google Books