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Difference between revisions of "Kanawha Coal Field"

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The Kanawha Coal Field is the name used to describe a coal producing section of West Virginia that includes the following counties, in whole or it part: [[Kanawha County|Kanawha]], [[Putnam County|Putnam]], [[Mason County|Mason]], [[Clay County|Clay]], [[Boone County|Boone]], [[Lincoln County|Lincoln]], and [[Nicholas County|Nicholas]] counties.
 
The Kanawha Coal Field is the name used to describe a coal producing section of West Virginia that includes the following counties, in whole or it part: [[Kanawha County|Kanawha]], [[Putnam County|Putnam]], [[Mason County|Mason]], [[Clay County|Clay]], [[Boone County|Boone]], [[Lincoln County|Lincoln]], and [[Nicholas County|Nicholas]] counties.
  
The first commercial mining of coal in Kanawha field resulted from the demands of the salt making operations located at the [[Kanawha Saltines]]. In 1817, David Ruffner began was the first to use coal to evaporate salt, that coal apparently coming from a mine opened the same year, by John P. Turner, located at the mouth of Burning Spring Branch, seven miles east of present-day [[Charleston, West Virginia|Charleston, WV]], on the north side of the [[Kanawha River]].
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The first commercial mining of coal in Kanawha field resulted from the demands of the salt making operations located at the [[Kanawha Saltines]]. In 1817, David Ruffner began was the first to use coal to evaporate salt, the coal apparently coming from a mine opened the same year, by John P. Turner, located at the mouth of Burning Spring Branch, seven miles east of present-day [[Charleston, West Virginia|Charleston, WV]], on the north side of the [[Kanawha River]].

Revision as of 03:36, 7 December 2005

The Kanawha Coal Field is the name used to describe a coal producing section of West Virginia that includes the following counties, in whole or it part: Kanawha, Putnam, Mason, Clay, Boone, Lincoln, and Nicholas counties.

The first commercial mining of coal in Kanawha field resulted from the demands of the salt making operations located at the Kanawha Saltines. In 1817, David Ruffner began was the first to use coal to evaporate salt, the coal apparently coming from a mine opened the same year, by John P. Turner, located at the mouth of Burning Spring Branch, seven miles east of present-day Charleston, WV, on the north side of the Kanawha River.